The National Black Catholic Congress, Inc.

By CNA/EWTN News
8/20/2017 | Catholic Online (www.catholic.org)

South Sudanese refugees in Uganda hits ONE MILLION - as South Sudan civil war rages on.


























The tally of South Sudanese refugees entering Uganda hits one million (Photo by: Al Jazeera)


​​Kampala, Uganda (CNA/EWTN News) - "Families are escaping a living hell in South Sudan," Muhumed Hussein, the Norwegian Refugee Council (NRC) Country Director for Uganda, stated Aug. 16.

"The stories they tell us when they arrive are truly horrific. The war in South Sudan continues to rage and the arrival of the one-millionth South Sudanese fleeing to Uganda is testament to this," Hussein continued.

Conflict in South Sudan began around its founding in 2011, when the country gained independence from Sudan. Promise for the country's bright future dimmed when political corruption and ethnic divisions overwhelmed the underdeveloped nation, causing famine and violence.

For the past three-and-a-half years, a civil war has been raging in the country. The nation is split between those loyal to President Salva Kiir and those loyal to former vice president Riek Machar. The conflict has additionally created various divisions and factions of local militia.

Caught in the cross-fire of the war are families, women, and children, who make up around 85 percent of the refugees now fleeing to Uganda. If they remain in South Sudan, they are labeled as rebels and are either killed, tortured, raped, or forced into fighting.

Since 2013, it is estimated that as many as 4 million have fled, leaving behind tens of thousands dead. Almost 1,000 citizens have died between the months of May and July alone, according to the South Sudan Human Rights Observatory.

In March, the bishops of South Sudan advocated a "sincere and honest" call to prayer after Kiir called for a day of prayer to be held March 10. Bishop Barani Eduardo Hiiboro of Tombura-Yambio said the whole country would be watching the president closely to see whether his attitude will trend toward peace.

The bishops have charged that the political elite "don't take their people in heart" and that both sides in the war have targeted civilians. They have also said the war has "no moral justification whatsoever."

On average, 1,800 South Sudanese refugees have been crossing into Uganda every day for the past year.

Those who make the dangerous journey to Uganda are welcomed with plots of land, meals, and medical care such as vaccinations, and are also able to travel and work within the country.

"The government response to accepting the South Sudanese refugees has been overwhelmingly positive, progressive, and welcoming," stated Sacha Manov, the deputy director in Uganda for the International Rescue Committee, according to Reuters.


​Although Uganda is welcoming of refugees, they are wearing thin on food, supplies, and shelter. The U.N. agency is receiving only about 21 percent of the total cost needed to provide for the refugees.

Camps that shelter refugees in Uganda are also in dire need of development, and often lack basic necessities, such as finished toilets.

In addition to aid from the U.N., Catholic Relief Services (CRS) is also contributing their help for the refugee crisis in Uganda.

"We have been with the people of South Sudan throughout this time of hope and peril. And we are not deserting them now," stated Jerry Farrell, the CRS Country Representative in South Sudan.

CRS has been offering refugee aid since 2015, by distributing over 6,600 tons of food to more than 250,000 people. The organization has also educated local farmers and trained the community in hygiene promoters to encourage a more sustainable future.

However, Farrell hopes that despite current efforts, the international community will do more to help the refugee crisis.

"The people of South Sudan, whom we have come to know so well, expect and deserve better. We hope that the international community will work to see their hopes are fulfilled," Farrell said.  Full story...

Black Catholic News

By Matt Hadro and Adelaide Mena

Washington D.C., Aug 23, 2017 / 03:02 am(CNA/EWTN News).- Catholic bishops from around the country recently condemned the white nationalism at rallies in Charlottesville, Virginia.

But what might be lesser known is that the Church has spoken out against racism through the centuries, and still calls for conversion from it.

“If we want a different kind of country in the future, we need to start today with a conversion in our own hearts, and an insistence on the same in others,” Archbishop Charles Chaput of Philadelphia said after the Charlottesville rallies.

White nationalists had held a “Unite the Right” rally in Charlottesville, Va. from Aug. 11-12, to protest the city's planned removal of a statue of Confederate General Robert E. Lee.

White supremacists from various extremist groups like the Ku Klux Klan and neo-Nazis participated in torch-lit rallies on Friday night and a daytime rally on Saturday, chanting racist messages like “Jew will not replace us,” and “blood and soil,” a historically white supremacist slogan used by the Nazi Party in the days of Hitler.

A diverse coalition of counter-protesters, from religious leaders to members of “Black Lives Matter” to the anarchist group Antifa, formed around the white supremacist rally.


Full story...

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A brief history of the Catholic Church's fight against racism


Shackled Legacy

History shows slavery helped build many U.S. colleges and universities

Stephen Smith | Kate Ellis | 9/4/17

As more schools begin to confront their participation in slavery, they also consider how to make amends.​​ Dozens of American colleges and universities are investigating their historic ties to the slave trade and debating how to atone.

Profits from slavery and related industries helped fund some of the most prestigious schools in the Northeast, including Harvard, Columbia, Princeton and Yale. And in many southern states — including the University of Virginia — enslaved people built college campuses and served faculty and students.

Today a growing movement to confront this legacy is being spurred by student protests and campus leaders reacting to high-profile racial conflict that has recently beset the nation. The result has been historical investigations, university commissions, conferences, memorials, and, at Georgetown, a handful of the descendants of enslaved people arriving as first-year students at the institution that owned their ancestors.

"The story of the American college is largely the story of the rise of the slave economy in the Atlantic world," says Craig Steven Wilder, an historian at MIT and author of "Ebony and Ivy: Race, Slavery, and the Troubled History of America's Universities."

Early benefactors who gave money to Brown and Harvard, for instance, made their fortunes running slave ships to Africa and milling cotton from plantations in the American South. Georgetown could afford to offer free tuition to its earliest students by virtue of the unpaid labor of Jesuit-owned slaves on plantations in Maryland. At the University of Virginia — founded and designed by Thomas Jefferson — slaves cooked and cleaned for the sons of the Southern gentry.


​"Yale inherited a small slave plantation in Rhode Island that it used to fund its first graduate programs and its first scholarships," Wilder says. "It aggressively sought out opportunities to benefit from the slave economies of New England and the broader Atlantic world."

To date, there is no single accounting of how much money flowed from the slave economy into coffers of American higher education. But Wilder says most American colleges founded before the Civil War relied on money derived from slavery. He suspects that many institutions are reluctant to examine this past. "There's not a lot of upside for them. You know these aren't great fundraising stories," Wilder says.  Full story...


















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