Young Adult Catholic Association


















How to Defend the Immaculate Conception

CATHOLIC ANSWERS

1. Why does the Church teach that Mary was immaculately conceived? Her conception is never even mentioned in Scripture. 

Before presenting the scriptural foundations for the Church’s belief in Mary’s Immaculate Conception, know that the person who is posing this question to you is probably operating with the three following misconceptions: (1) The doctrine infringes upon the universality of Christ’s redemption and the unique holiness of God. (2) The Church has no scriptural foundation for the teaching. (3) If any doctrine is not in Scripture it must not be true. Any adequate defense of Our Lady’s Immaculate Conception is incomplete unless all three of these areas are addressed. 

The first issue that you need to cover is sola scriptura—the idea that the Bible is the only rule of faith. One of the reasons why our separated brethren have difficulty accepting certain Marian teachings is that they do not understand the scriptural role of sacred Tradition and the magisterium.

The Catholic Church was commissioned by Christ to teach all nations and to teach them infallibly—guided, as he promised, by the Holy Spirit until the end of the world (see John 14:25, 16:13). The mere fact that the Church teaches that something definitely true is a guarantee that it is true (see Luke 10:16).

Besides historical evidence and the authority of Tradition, several biblical texts can be offered. In Genesis 3:15, God states that there is to be an enmity between the “woman” and the serpent, and this enmity is shared between her seed and its seed. Her seed is the messiah, who stands in opposition to the seed of the serpent. The mother of the messiah is said to share the same enmity—total opposition—with Satan.
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​News and Editorials
WHY YOUNG ADULT BLACK READERS NEED MORE DIVERSE LITERATURE
A few months ago, I read a CNN article about the lack of diversity in young adult literature. As I read it, I found myself agreeing about the need for more diversity and reminiscing. As a teen, I could never find a book by a black young adult author that I could relate to. In fact, my favorite young adult book was The Outsiders  by S.E. Hinton.


A few months ago, I read a CNN article about the lack of diversity in young adult literature. As I read it, I found myself agreeing about the need for more diversity and reminiscing. As a teen, I could never find a book by a black young adult author that I could relate to. In fact, my favorite young adult book was The Outsiders  by S.E. Hinton.

The reason I related to The Outsiders and not any book by a black YA author was because my experiences as a black person were different from those portrayed in the books I found. I was a nerdy book lover who also happened to be half-black and half-Vietnamese. The few bi-racial characters I found were black and white, and the only nerds in YA literature I found were white or Asian.

As the CNN article states, young black readers need to know that they can become witches and wizards, vampire slayers and demon hunters, and dystopian heroes. Characters like Harry Potter or Katniss have the potential to appeal to any race, because they have qualities that are found in everyone. For every white female Katniss fighting for her family, there is a black female protecting her sibling or providing for her parents.


Not all black teens experience life the same way. Some teen black females may get pregnant, but others may suffer from an eating disorder. Some black teen males may be athletic, but others may be inclined in the culinary arts.

Read more: http://www.forharriet.com/2014/08/why-young-adult-black-readers-need-more.html#ixzz4SHB0wUku 

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Young Adult Leaders (ages 18 to about 35) can find support through resources, events, and special ministries targeted to the rising leadership of the Catholic Church. Connect to other young adults nationally and worldwide.

Young Adult Leaders

What's keeping young adults out of church?

By Bryan Cones | ARTICLE










Maybe it’s time to let generations X and Y have their say.

It was one of those conversations: Late in a family holiday visit, the topic of religion comes up. This time it was my 20-something brother, talking about why his friends reject organized religion. “None of us believes in what’s in the Bible,” he said, going on to list the various annoying things churches do—notably telling people what to do—along with the cardinal sin of religious people: hypocrisy. “It’s just a bunch of manmade rules,” he said, an opinion I think is hardly uncommon among his peers.

I admit I didn’t handle it very well. I got defensive. I told him the term “organized religion” was redundant, since religion, by definition, is organized. I told him he didn’t really understand the Bible. Of course churches are human institutions, I said, but that doesn’t mean they don’t have something important to offer.

My less-than-successful defense of religion came to mind soon after, when a friend forwarded me the now well-known YouTube video, “Why I hate religion but love Jesus,” that has more than 18 million views. The spoken-word poem by preacher Jefferson Bethke hardly lacks faith, but its four minutes aren’t encouraging for anyone who wants to see someone under 30 in the pews. Read more...

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The United States Conference of Catholic Bishops Statement on Pornography

November 2015